Stanford HAI

Stanford’s newest institute, the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence — or Stanford HAI — hopes advance artificial intelligence (AI) research, education, policy and practice to improve the human condition.

When the university needed a video to inaugurate this ambitious new program, they turned to Stanford Video to help promote their message to world.  We helped produce and create a promotional video that describes the institute and its mission to the university to inaugurate the event and to promote online.

We also live-streamed the conference and created near-live video tweets for the Stanford HAI twitter channel encouraging reactions and conversations with followers worldwide.

John Etchemendy and Fei-Fei Li
John Etchemendy and Fei-Fei Li will co-direct the new Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. (Image credit: Drew Kelly for Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence)

 

Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne spoke at the symposium along with speakers such as Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates and California Governor Gavin Newsom, as well as leading experts Kate Crawford of NYU, Jeff Dean of Google, Demis Hassabis of DeepMind, Alison Gopnik of UC Berkeley, Reid Hoffman of Greylock Partners and Eric Horvitz of Microsoft Research.

Bill Gates on stage with Stanford AI4ALL graduates. Credit: Steve Castillo
Bill Gates on stage with Stanford AI4ALL graduates Amy Jin and Stephanie Tena-Meza

The institute launches with 200 participating faculty from all seven schools at the university. In collaboration with appropriate schools and departments, it also plans to hire at least 20 new faculty, including 10 junior fellows, from across fields spanning humanities, engineering, medicine, the arts or the basic sciences, with a particular interest in those working at the intersection of disciplines. It will also house research fellows, convene groups of professionals to solve critical issues to humanity and distribute funding to spur novel research directions.


Stanford Video live tweets